Monday, May 21, 2018

Week 34- Butterflies

The students really enjoyed making their Eric Carle inspired webs and spiders last week! Special thanks to the families that sent in materials. 

Along with a nonfiction text about the changes from a caterpillar to a butterfly, we have another of Eric's books for a read aloud this week- a classic- The Very Hungry Caterpillar. (Fun fact- Eric was inspired by a hole puncher to write this story.) 

We will be putting a lot of work into writing projects this week. We hope you are able to join us at our upcoming presentations. Please take a moment to fill out this Google Sheet, if you have not already.
https://goo.gl/forms/qWpcqq4rmeGN2KA62 

In math we continue working on subtraction while strengthening our fact fluency.

As we near the end of the year, we will also be working on some assessments. 

Next week, some of the middle school students are opening up their lemonade stands. This is an Oasis tradition. It is a competitive exercise of commerce and the middle schoolers come up with some very enticing ways to get customers to visit their stands. The price is usually 25 cents per cup. Students tend to spend as much as they are given at one time. This can lead to a lot of liquid in tiny bladders at a time when a lot of young ones are experiencing the same situation which can lead to bathroom accidents. Please keep this in mind when deciding how much money to send with your child. It is also helpful if you remind them that if they drink lemonade at lunch recess, they should also make a bathroom trip during that same break. If you know that your child has a more delicate bladder, it may not be a bad idea to send a change of clothes in their backpacks until the end of the year.


HOMEWORK
Reading:
10 minutes each night. Reading can include reading stories, the poems in
the binder, and practicing sight words.


Your child should ideally be spending time with familiar texts (such as the
printed books they bring home), as they help reinforce sight words in context
and using word solving strategies. However, these books are not real meaty
when it comes to comprehension, so they should also be spending time with
trade books (high quality children’s literature- like from the local library or
bookstore). These books lend themselves better to conversations. When you
read to them, you are also providing important modeling of a fluent reader
and a pleasant reading experience.

Math:
Remember, math should be done for 10 minutes each night.
Your child may work on any addition or subtraction skill objective. These are IXL sections I, J, K, and L.


You are welcome, and in fact encouraged, to continue having your child 
practice their addition skills by using real world objects- especially if they 
complete the IXL tasks quickly. Yay for math fact fluency! They may also 
visit any of the I section addition skills.

Monday, May 14, 2018

Week 33- Spiders

This week, we not only take a closer look at spiders, but also one of our focus authors- Eric Carle. His book The Very Busy Spider and a great nonfiction text are in our reading line up. We will be continuing to strengthen our comprehension and discussion skills by sharing interesting facts, comparing and contrasting, discussing the author’s point, and retelling the story.
 

We could use some glitter glue for a raised texture activity- Eric Carle often includes engaging elements in his books that include cutouts, flaps, and raised texture. This is a great way for students to incorporate professional moves into their own work. We will also be doing some painting with different textures so if you have items that you think could lead to interesting textures (things we could use to paint with or drag through paint such as bubble wrap, q tips, toothpicks, cooking implements, pine cones, ribbon...) that you do NOT want returned, we would love to use them. This painting adventure will be taking place Wednesday afternoon and I would greatly appreciate additional helping hands.

Our class’s closer look into Eric Carle's books has laid the groundwork for them to start writing their own Eric Carle Inspired books this week. I can’t wait to see what they come up with!

In math, we continue our work with subtraction. We meet Linus the Minus this week!




HOMEWORK
Reading:
10 minutes each night. Reading can include reading stories, the poems in
the binder, and practicing sight words.

Your child should ideally be spending time with familiar texts (such as the
printed books they bring home), as they help reinforce sight words in context
and using word solving strategies. However, these books are not real meaty
when it comes to comprehension, so they should also be spending time with
trade books (high quality children’s literature- like from the local library or
bookstore). These books lend themselves better to conversations. When you
read to them, you are also providing important modeling of a fluent reader
and a pleasant reading experience.

Math:
Remember, math should be done for 10 minutes each night.


You are welcome, and in fact encouraged, to continue having your child 
practice their addition skills by using real world objects- especially if they 
complete the IXL tasks quickly. Yay for math fact fluency! They may also 
visit any of the I section addition skills.

Monday, May 7, 2018

Week 32- Jaguars

This week's topic is jaguars! We learned a bit about jaguars during our rainforest weeks and the students were keen to find out more so here we go! We have a couple of traditional nonfiction texts along with the true tale of a jaguar cub that has become an animal diplomat for raising awareness about the conservation program that helped save him.

In writing, we are delving deeper into our author study of Eric Carle as this work becomes foundationally tied to where our book study project has led. 


In math, we more formally bring in the plus sign with our helpful friend, Gus the Plus.


(Next week, we meet his brother...)

After a couple more days with addition as our focus, subtraction moves into center stage. As we make this shift, it is important that we help the children see it as a kind of continuation. When we are subtracting, we are still working with a part, part, whole relationship among numbers. Instead of putting two parts together to make the whole, we are now taking the whole apart into the two smaller parts.

HOMEWORK
Reading:
10 minutes each night. Reading can include reading stories, the poems in 
the binder, and practicing sight words.

Your child should ideally be spending time with familiar texts (such as the 
printed books they bring home), as they help reinforce sight words in context 
and using word solving strategies. However, these books are not real meaty 
when it comes to comprehension, so they should also be spending time with 
trade books (high quality children’s literature- like from the local library or 
bookstore). These books lend themselves better to conversations. When you 
read to them, you are also providing important modeling of a fluent reader 
and a pleasant reading experience.

Math:
Remember, math should be done for 10 minutes each night.
Monday:  I.1 Add with pictures - sums up to 5 
Tuesday:  I.2 Addition sentences - sums up to 5 
Wednesday:  I.3 Add two numbers - sums up to 5 
Thursday:  I.4 Make a number using addition - sums up to 5 


You are welcome, and in fact encouraged, to continue having your child practice their addition skills by using real world objects- especially if they complete the IXL tasks quickly. Yay for math fact fluency!

Monday, April 30, 2018

Week 31- Plants

This week, we will be learning about plants- their parts, cycle, and needs. 
We have a great nonfiction text and a couple of fiction texts, including an 
Eric Carle. We have been spending some time thinking about what point 
author’s are making in their books- what they want us to learn. This often 
applies to fiction as well as nonfiction. When a character learns a lesson 
it is often a lesson we can apply to our own lives as well. This is another 
aspect of books that you can touch on in your discussions with your child.

In writing, we continue our narrative writing with more of an emphasis on 
checking our own writing for desired components.

In math, we continue with our combinations to make 10. The students have 
been doing a great job with their combinations. Fluency is the name of the 
game!

HOMEWORK
Reading:
10 minutes each night. Reading can include reading stories, the poems in 
the binder, and practicing sight words.

Your child should ideally be spending time with familiar texts (such as the 
printed books they bring home), as they help reinforce sight words in context 
and using word solving strategies. However, these books are not real meaty 
when it comes to comprehension, so they should also be spending time with 
trade books (high quality children’s literature- like from the local library or 
bookstore). These books lend themselves better to conversations. When you 
read to them, you are also providing important modeling of a fluent reader 
and a pleasant reading experience.

Math:
Remember, math should be done for 10 minutes each night.
IXL does offer several objectives that allow for practice with Addition up to 5 
(skill section I), however they use the math symbols + and =. These are not yet 
included as a focus in our math instruction. We are working on laying a strong 
foundation with the important part-part-whole concept so we emphasis the 
language of ___ and ___ make___ at first.

For homework this week, if you wish, you may try out the IXL I skills and 
simply connect the symbols to the language used in class. If this makes sense 
to your child and is not causing confusion or stress, this can be your child’s 
homework practice.

ALTERNATIVELY, you may continue to do the below type of math practice, 
preferably with an emphasis on solving math stories or addition based dice or 
card games. It is best to start with lower numbers/amounts and work up to 
larger amounts as your child builds confidence and fluency.
This is a great time to play math games with your child. You can use materials 
from Math Night, online or printable activities, or traditional board/card 
games that have a math component.

Revisit any skill from the Comparing (G) section. We will be reinforcing 
comparing smaller amounts for a couple of days, before moving into 
comparing the teen numbers. IXL does not have objectives for comparing 
items within 20, so this is where materials from Math Night or collections of 
items from around the house can come in handy.  If your child seems pretty 
solid with comparing within 10, move on to comparing groups of real items 
up to 20. Using terms, such as “more”, “less”, “fewer”, “the same”, and 
“equal”. It is also great to practice “how many more/fewer”. For example if 
I have 12 crayons and 10 pencils, I could talk about how I have 2 more 
crayons or 2 fewer pencils. When making such comparisons, noting groups 
of 10 or how far away from a group of 10 is valuable too (I have 7 gummy 
bears- that’s just 3 away from a whole group of 10). When using real items 
you can physically group them into 10s. You can also physically line them 
up item to item to see how many more/fewer there are.

If it seems appropriate for your child, you may also spend some time 
revisiting any D section skill.

Tuesday, April 24, 2018

Week 30- Bees

Building off of last week's science focus of taking care of the world around us, this week we will be learning about bees. We will read a nonfiction text that shows how they are helpful, interesting animals. We will use this text to further explore how author's support their points. We will also read a story called The Greedy Bee. We will be using this book to help us build a habit of collecting interesting words.


In writing, we continue working on narratives with a focus on seeing ourselves as storytellers and making sure our stories include key information including the feelings of ourselves and other people.

This week in math, we will be spending quite a bit of time with making combinations to 10. 

 

Project Update:
A helpful parent pointed out that our original date for the presentation of our project was the same night as graduation. The new date for our presentation is May 31st. Please save Thursday May 31st at 4:30 on your calendars!

HOMEWORK
Reading:
10 minutes each night. Reading can include reading stories, the poems in 
the binder, and practicing sight words.

Try for a combination of paper familiar reads and trade book read alongs. 

Some notes to guide book discussions:

When reading together, remember to ask questions and share thoughts about the 
characters and what they are thinking, feeling, or doing. It is also a good idea to 
talk about the problem the character had (the uh-oh part of the story) and the  
solution-how it was fixed (the phew part of the story).  See if your child can tell you 
most of the important things that happened in the story.

If you are reading a non-fiction book together, some of the things you can discuss include:
* facts that you learn
* things that surprised you
* things you are wondering about
* connections to other things you have read
* connections to things you have experienced   

Math:
Remember, math should be done for 10 minutes each night.
IXL does offer several objectives that allow for practice with Addition up to 5 
(skill section I), however they use the math symbols + and =. These are not 
yet included as a focus in our math instruction. We are working on laying a 
strong foundation with the important part-part-whole concept so we emphasis 
the language of ___ and ___ make___ at first.

For homework this week, if you wish, you may try out the IXL I skills and 
simply connect the symbols to the language used in class. If this makes sense 
to your child and is not causing confusion or stress, this can be your child’s 
homework practice.

ALTERNATIVELY, you may continue to do the below type of math practice,
 preferably with an emphasis on solving math stories or addition based dice or 
card games. It is best to start with lower numbers/amounts and work up to 
larger amounts as your child builds confidence and fluency.
This is a great time to play math games with your child. You can use materials 
from Math Night, online or printable activities, or traditional board/card 
games that have a math component.

Revisit any skill from the Comparing (G) section. We will be reinforcing 
comparing smaller amounts for a couple of days, before moving into 
comparing the teen numbers. IXL does not have objectives for comparing 
items within 20, so this is where materials from Math Night or collections 
of items from around the house can come in handy.  If your child seems 
pretty solid with comparing within 10, move on to comparing groups of
real items up to 20. Using terms, such as “more”, “less”, “fewer”, 
“the same”, and “equal”. It is also great to practice “how many more/fewer”. 
For example if I have 12 crayons and 10 pencils, I could talk about how I 
have 2 more crayons or 2 fewer pencils. When making such comparisons, 
noting groups of 10 or how far away from a group of 10 is valuable too 
(I have 7 gummy bears- that’s just 3 away from a whole group of 10). When 
using real items you can physically group them into 10s. You can also 
physically line them up item to item to see how many more/fewer there are.

If it seems appropriate for your child, you may also spend some time revisiting 

any D section skill.